loading page

Piceatannol, a resveratrol analog, attenuates Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis like symptoms in NC/Nga mice
  • +2
  • Chang Hyung Lee,
  • Hee Yang,
  • Jung Han Yoon Park,
  • Jong-Eun Kim,
  • Ki Won Lee
Chang Hyung Lee
Seoul National University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Author Profile
Hee Yang
Seoul National University
Author Profile
Jung Han Yoon Park
Seoul National University
Author Profile
Jong-Eun Kim
Korea National University of Transportation
Author Profile
Ki Won Lee
Seoul National University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Author Profile

Abstract

Background: Piceatannol is a resveratrol metabolite commonly found in red wine, grapes, and passion fruit seeds. Several studies have investigated the immune-modulating effects of piceatannol on processes related to allergic reactions. However, the relationship between piceatannol and atopic dermatitis (AD) has not yet been reported. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the effects of piceatannol in animal and cell line models. Methods: AD-like symptoms and skin lesions were induced by repeated topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE) on the skin of NC/Nga mice. Piceatannol was topically applied five times per week for four weeks. The molecular mechanism of piceatannol was studied in the TNFα/IFNγ-induced HaCaT cell line. Results: Topical application of piceatannol attenuated DFE-induced AD-like symptoms, as shown by skin thickness, dermatitis score, scratching time, and skin water loss. Histopathological analysis showed that piceatannol suppressed DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin. These observations occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of inflammatory markers, including serum TARC, MDC, and IgE. In addition, piceatannol alleviated Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 in the skin tissue. Piceatannol decreased phosphorylation of JAK-STAT protein in the TNFα/IFNγ-induced HaCaT cell line. A molecular docking study showed that piceatannol strongly interacts with JAK1, suggesting a possible piceatannol mode of action. Conclusions: Piceatannol, a metabolite of resveratrol, has potential therapeutic efficacy in treating AD by targeting JAK1.