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Genomic analysis of an outbreak of bovine tuberculosis in a man-made multi-host species system: a call for action on wildlife in Brazil
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  • Daiane A. R. Lima,
  • Cristina K. Zimpel,
  • José Salvatore Patané,
  • Taiana T. Silva-Pereira,
  • Rodrigo N. Etges,
  • Rudielle A. Rodrigues,
  • Alberto M.R. Dávila,
  • Cássia Ikuta,
  • José Ferreira Neto,
  • Ana Marcia Guimaraes,
  • Flábio Araújo
Daiane A. R. Lima
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul
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Cristina K. Zimpel
Universidade de Sao Paulo Departamento de Microbiologia
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José Salvatore Patané
Instituto Butantan
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Taiana T. Silva-Pereira
Universidade de Sao Paulo Departamento de Microbiologia
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Rodrigo N. Etges
Governo do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul
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Rudielle A. Rodrigues
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul
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Alberto M.R. Dávila
Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
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Cássia Ikuta
Universidade de Sao Paulo Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia
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José Ferreira Neto
Universidade de Sao Paulo Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia
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Ana Marcia Guimaraes
Universidade de Sao Paulo Departamento de Microbiologia
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Flábio Araújo
Embrapa Beef Cattle Campo Grande Mato Grosso do Sul Brazil
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Abstract

We report on a 15-year-long outbreak of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in wildlife from a Brazilian safari park. A timeline of diagnostic events and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 21 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from deer and llamas were analyzed. Accordingly, from 2003 to 2018, at least 16 animals, from 8 species, died due to TB, which is likely an underestimated number. In three occasions since 2013, the deer presented positive tuberculin tests, leading to the park closure and culling of all deer. WGS indicated that multiple M. bovis strains were circulating, with at least three founding introductions since the park inauguration in 1977. Recent transmission events between nearby farms and the park were not found based on WGS. Lastly, by discussing socio-economic and environmental factors escaping current regulatory gaps that were determinant of this outbreak, we pledge for the development of a plan to report and control bTB in wildlife in Brazil.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

20 Apr 2021Submitted to Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
20 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
20 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
28 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
04 Jun 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
04 Jun 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major