loading page

Dysplastic nevi: do they exist and what are they actually?
  • +6
  • Dr. Carolina Diamandis,
  • Dimitri V Bodrov,
  • Alexander Davis,
  • Marius Lazar,
  • Aleksandros Makris,
  • Efstathia Papadopoulou,
  • Catherine Smith,
  • Carolina Diamandis,
  • Lcg Greece
Dr. Carolina Diamandis
Author Profile
Dimitri V Bodrov
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Alexander Davis
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Marius Lazar
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Aleksandros Makris
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Efstathia Papadopoulou
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Catherine Smith
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Carolina Diamandis
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16
Lcg Greece
Lazar Group Non-profit Research Consortium Kifissias 16

Abstract

The understanding of dysplastic (also known as atypical) nevi as a precursor lesion of malignant melanoma is hampered by incongruities on different levels. Neither epidemiological data nor clinical and histomorphological features nor biological aspects are suitable to prove a sequential tumor progression from nevi to melanoma. With respect to basic mechanisms of malignant transformation such as proliferation rate and telomerase activity, no significant differences between dysplastic and other nevi could be found. Thus, the dysplastic nevus represents a type of benign nevi and is to be distinguished from early forms of malignant melanoma in diagnostics. Their use as an easy to take "emergency exits" for pathologists must come to an end.