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A chromosome‐level genome assembly of Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis provides new insights into salmonids evolution
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  • Wenbo Zhu,
  • Zhongkai Wang,
  • Haorong Li,
  • Hui Xiang,
  • Ping Li,
  • Lili Ni,
  • Li Jiao,
  • Yandong Ren,
  • Ping You
Wenbo Zhu
Shaanxi Normal University
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Zhongkai Wang
Northwestern Polytechnical University
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Haorong Li
Northwestern Polytechnical University
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Hui Xiang
South China Normal University
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Ping Li
Shanghai Ocean University
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Lili Ni
Shaanxi Normal University
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Li Jiao
Shaanxi Normal University
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Yandong Ren
Northwestern Polytechnical University
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Ping You
Shaanxi Normal University
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Abstract

The salmonid-specific fourth vertebrate whole-genome duplication (Ss4R) occurred ~80 million years ago in the ancestor of all salmonids and provides a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary history of the duplicated genome. Study of the genome of Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis might be particularly insightful given that this is the only Brachymystax species with a published salmonid genome. Here, we present a high-quality chromosome-level genome assembly for B. l. tsinlingensis and found that the salmonids have a unique GC content and codon usage, have undergone a whole-genome duplication event and a burst of transposon-mediated repeat expansion, have a slower evolutionary rate, and possess specific expanded gene families and unique positively selected genes. Generally, the B. l. tsinlingensis genome could provide a valuable reference for the study of other salmonids as well as aid the conservation of this endangered species.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

18 Apr 2021Submitted to Molecular Ecology Resources
14 May 2021Assigned to Editor
14 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
19 May 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned