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Food allergy in infants assessed in two German birth cohorts 10 years after the EuroPrevall Study
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  • Daniela Roehrl,
  • Susanne Brandstetter,
  • Linda Siziba,
  • Dietrich Rothenbacher,
  • Vincent Gaertner,
  • Susanne Harner,
  • Angela Köninger,
  • Christian Apfelbacher,
  • Michael Melter,
  • Jon Genuneit,
  • Michael Kabesch
Daniela Roehrl
University of Regensburg
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Susanne Brandstetter
Barmherzige Brüder gemeinnützige Krankenhaus GmbH
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Linda Siziba
Leipzig University
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Dietrich Rothenbacher
Ulm University
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Vincent Gaertner
University of Regensburg
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Susanne Harner
University of Regensburg
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Angela Köninger
University of Regensburg
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Christian Apfelbacher
University of Regensburg
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Michael Melter
Barmherzige Brüder gemeinnützige Krankenhaus GmbH
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Jon Genuneit
Leipzig University
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Michael Kabesch
University of Regensburg
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Abstract

Background: The prevalence of food allergies (FA) in children increased rapidly at the turn of the century. The EuroPrevall study identified Germany as a country with very high prevalence of FA at that time. Using two large German birth cohorts we provide an update of the status quo ten years later. Methods: KUNO Kids and Ulm SPATZ Health studies are two ongoing prospective birth cohorts. Information on FA was obtained by questionnaires at birth and after 6, 12 and 24 months. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate risk factors during pregnancy, birth and early childhood. Results: In 1139 and 1006 children from KUNO Kids and SPATZ the point prevalence of parent-reported FA symptoms at the ages of 1 and 2 years was 13.2% and 13.9 % in KUNO Kids. Doctor’s diagnosed FA at 1 and 2 years was 2.4% and 2.7% in KUNO Kids and 2.3% and 3% in SPATZ. Cow’s milk and citrus fruits were most frequently suspected by parents to cause FA symptoms. Atopy in the child was associated with a higher frequency of FA at any time, whereas atopy in first degree relatives was only associated with FA at year 1. Smoke exposure during pregnancy was a risk for FA at age 2. Conclusion: The prevalence of food allergy seems to have plateaued in the last 10 years in Germany. FA is often suspected by parents but only rarely diagnosed by oral food challenge. Risk factor analysis may help to establish personalized health approaches.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

20 May 2021Submitted to Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
27 May 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
16 Jun 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending