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Physical activity in asthma control and its immune modulatory effect in asthmatic preschoolers
  • +17
  • Debbie Maurer,
  • Chengyao Liu,
  • PARASKEVI XEPAPADAKI,
  • Claus Bachert,
  • Susetta Finotto,
  • Ya-dong Gao,
  • Anna Graser,
  • Tuomas Jartti,
  • Walter Kistler,
  • Marek Kowalski,
  • Heikki Lukkarinen,
  • Maria Passioti,
  • Barbara Stanic,
  • Ge Tan,
  • Michael Villiger,
  • Luo Zhang,
  • Nan Zhang,
  • Mübeccel Akdis,
  • Nikolaos Papadopoulos,
  • Cezmi Akdis
Debbie Maurer
University of Zurich Swiss Institute of Allergy & Asthma Research
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Chengyao Liu
University of Zurich Swiss Institute of Allergy & Asthma Research
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PARASKEVI XEPAPADAKI
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Claus Bachert
Upper Airway Research Laboratory (URL),
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Susetta Finotto
Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg
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Ya-dong Gao
Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University
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Anna Graser
Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg
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Tuomas Jartti
Turku University Hospital
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Walter Kistler
Hospital Davos
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Marek Kowalski
University of Łódź
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Heikki Lukkarinen
Turku University Hospital
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Maria Passioti
University of Athens
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Barbara Stanic
University of Zürich
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Ge Tan
Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
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Michael Villiger
Hospital Davos
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Luo Zhang
Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University,
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Nan Zhang
Upper Airway Research Laboratory (URL)
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Mübeccel Akdis
University of Zurich
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Nikolaos Papadopoulos
Second Pediatric Clinic
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Cezmi Akdis
University of Zurich
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Abstract

Background: The impact of physical activity (PA) on immune response is a hot topic in exercise immunology, but studies involving asthmatic children are scarce. We examine the level of PA and TV attendance (TVA) in asthmatic children to assess the role on asthma control and immune response to various stimulants. Methods: Weekly PA and daily TVA were obtained from questionnaires at inclusion of the PreDicta study. PBMC cultures were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), R848, poly I:C and zymosan. Cytokines were measured and quantified in cell culture supernatants using luminometric multiplex immunofluorescence beads-based assay. Results: Asthmatic preschoolers showed significantly more TVA than their healthy peers (58.6% vs. 41.5% 1-3h daily and only 25.7% vs. 47.2% ≤ 1h daily). Poor asthma control was associated with less frequent PA (75% no or occasional activity in uncontrolled vs. 20% in controlled asthma; 25% ≥ 3x weekly vs. 62%). Asthmatics with increased PA exhibited elevated cytokine levels in response to stimulants, suggesting a readiness of circulating immune cells for type-1, -2 and -17 cytokine release compared to low-PA and high-TVA subjects. Low PA and high TVA were associated with increased proinflammatory cytokines. Proinflammatory cytokines were correlating with each other in in-vitro immune responses of asthmatic children, but not healthy controls. Conclusion: Asthmatic children show more sedentary behavior than healthy subjects, while poor asthma control leads to a decrease in PA. Asthmatic children profit from exercise, as elevated cytokine levels in stimulated conditions indicate an immune system prepared for a strong response in case of infection.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

28 May 2021Submitted to Allergy
31 May 2021Assigned to Editor
31 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
07 Jun 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned