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Differences between lung mechanics, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength in former smokers and COPD individuals.
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  • Claudia M M Russi,
  • Alessandra C Toledo-Arruda,
  • Maysa A R Brandao-Rangel,
  • Luciano A Chaves,
  • Lucas P Sales-Dias,
  • Tamara Costa-Guimaraes,
  • Susane M M Souza,
  • Regiane Albertini,
  • Luis Oliveira,
  • Ricardo S Navarro,
  • Claudio R Frison,
  • Rodolfo Vieira
Claudia M M Russi
Universidade Brasil
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Alessandra C Toledo-Arruda
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
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Maysa A R Brandao-Rangel
Federal University of Sao Paulo, UNIFESP - Universidade Federal de São Paulo
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Luciano A Chaves
Brazilian Institute of Teaching and Research in Pulmonary and Exercise Immunology (IBEPIPE)
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Lucas P Sales-Dias
Universidade Brasil
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Tamara Costa-Guimaraes
Universidade Brasil
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Susane M M Souza
Brazilian Institute of Teaching and Research in Pulmonary and Exercise Immunology (IBEPIPE)
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Regiane Albertini
Federal University of Sao Paulo
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Luis Oliveira
UniEVANGELICA University Centre of Anapolis
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Ricardo S Navarro
Universidade Brasil
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Claudio R Frison
Brazilian Institute of Teaching and Research in Pulmonary and Exercise Immunology (IBEPIPE)
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Rodolfo Vieira
Universidade Brasil
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Abstract

Background: Reduced peripheral and respiratory muscle strength correlates with impaired lung function in COPD, but whether diminishement in peripheral and respiratory muscle strength correlates with lung mechanis is unknown. Aims: To investigate whether spirometric and respiratory and peripheral muscle strength correlates with small airways obstruction evaluated by impulse oscillometry. Methods: Nighteen COPD GOLD II and twenty former smokers’ individuals were evaluated for lung function, lung mechanics, maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure and hand grip strength test. Results: COPD presented reduced FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (p<0.001) compared to former smokers with no changes in FVC. In COPD the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC showed a negative correlation with BMI (P<0.05, R=-0.56 and -0.43, respectively). The total resistance of respiratory system and small airway resistance were reduced in the COPD compared to former smoke group. The COPD individuals showed a negative moderate correlation between FEV1 and impedance (R=-0,664; P<0.01); airway resistance (R=-0,593, P<0.05) and peripheral airway resistance (R=-0,547, P<0.05). The negative correlation was low in COPD individuals for reactance (R=-0,434, P<0.05) and proximal airway resistance (R=-0,480, P<0.05). These correlations were not found in the former smoke group. Hand grip strength measured in the right arm showed a moderate negative correlation with the maximal inspiratory pressure (R=-0,539, P<0.05) in COPD individuals. There was no correlation between PIMax and PEMax with none of the spirometric or oscillometric parameters (p>0.05) in COPD or former smokers’ individuals. Conclusions: Lung mechanics correlate with spirometric parameters in COPD patients but not with respiratory and peripheral muscle strength.