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Peroxiredoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
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  • Akiyuki Uzawa,
  • Masahiro Mori,
  • Hiroki Masuda,
  • Ryohei Ohtani,
  • Tomohiko Uchida,
  • Reiji Aoki,
  • Satoshi Kuwabara
Akiyuki Uzawa
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Masahiro Mori
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Hiroki Masuda
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Ryohei Ohtani
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Tomohiko Uchida
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Reiji Aoki
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Satoshi Kuwabara
Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University
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Peer review status:ACCEPTED

04 Apr 2020Submitted to Clinical & Experimental Immunology
06 Apr 2020Submission Checks Completed
06 Apr 2020Assigned to Editor
07 Apr 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
23 Apr 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
28 Apr 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
30 Jun 20201st Revision Received
30 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
02 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
02 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Accept

Abstract

Peroxiredoxins (PRXs) are intracellular antioxidative enzymes but work as inflammatory amplifiers under the extracellular condition. To date, the function of PRXs in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PRXs play a role in the pathogenesis of MS and NMOSD. We analyzed levels of PRXs (PRX1, PRX5, and PRX6) in the CSF and serum of 16 patients with MS, 16 patients with NMOSD, and 15 patients with other neurological disorders (ONDs). We identified potential correlations between significantly elevated PRXs levels and the clinical variables in patients with MS and NMOSD. Additionally, pathological analyses of PRXs (PRX1-6) in the central nervous system were performed using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), animal model of MS. We found that serum levels of PRX5 and PRX6 in patients with MS and NMOSD were higher compared with those in patients with ONDs (p < 0.05). Furthermore, high levels of PRX5 and PRX6 were partly associated with blood–brain barrier dysfunction and disease duration in NMOSD patients. No significant elevation was found in CSF PRXs levels of MS and NMOSD. Spinal cords from EAE mice showed remarkable PRX5 staining, especially in CD45+ infiltrating cells. In conclusion, PRX5 and PRX6 may play a role in the pathogeneses of MS and NMOSD.