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A specialist herbivore suppresses host plant resistance by inducing a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase
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  • Meng Ye,
  • Peng Kuai,
  • Lingfei Hu,
  • Miaofeng Ye,
  • Hao Sun,
  • Matthias Erb,
  • Yonggen Lou
Meng Ye
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Peng Kuai
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Lingfei Hu
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Miaofeng Ye
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Hao Sun
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Matthias Erb
University of Bern
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Yonggen Lou
Zhejiang University - Zijingang Campus
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Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

08 Apr 2020Submitted to Plant, Cell & Environment
08 Apr 2020Submission Checks Completed
08 Apr 2020Assigned to Editor
15 Apr 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
19 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Jun 20201st Revision Received
18 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
18 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
23 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending

Abstract

The mechanisms by which herbivores induce plant defenses are well studied. However, how specialized herbivores suppress plant resistance is still poorly understood. Here, we discovered a rice (Oryza sativa) leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, OsLRR-RLK2, which is induced upon attack by gravid females of a specialist piercing-sucking herbivore, the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens). Silencing OsLRR-RLK2 decreases the constitutive activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase (OsMPK6) and alters BPH-induced transcript levels of several defense-related WRKY transcription factors. Moreover, silencing OsLRR-RLK2 reduces BPH-induction of jasmonic acid and ethylene but promotes the biosynthesis of both elicited salicylic acid and H2O2; silencing also enhances the production of volatiles emitted from rice plants infested with gravid BPH females. These changes decrease BPH preference and performance in the glasshouse and the field. Our study identifies OsLRR-RLK2 as a major susceptibility factor of rice against BPH. It is likely to be employed by BPH to suppress host plant defenses for its own benefit via signaling crosstalk and/or changing the plant’s defense-related signaling profile.