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The Cost‑Utility of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate for Treating Acute Asthma in Children
  • jefferson buendia,
  • Ranniery Acuña-Cordero,
  • Carlos Rodriguez-Martinez
jefferson buendia
University of Antioquia
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Ranniery Acuña-Cordero
Hospital Militar Central
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Carlos Rodriguez-Martinez
School of Medicine, Universidad El Bosque
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Peer review status:IN REVISION

12 May 2020Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
13 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
13 May 2020Assigned to Editor
17 May 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
01 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
06 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
18 Jun 20201st Revision Received
18 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
18 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
18 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
29 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
29 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor

Abstract

Introduction Despite the evidence supporting the use of intravenous Magnesium Sulfate (MS) in acute asthma; this drug continues being considered as the second line in pediatric acute asthma exacerbations. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MS in acute asthma. Methods A decision tree model was used to estimate the Cost-utility study that compared MS versus standard treatment (control group) in an infant with acute asthma in the emergency setting. Cost data were obtained from a retrospective study on asthma from tertiary centers in Rionegro, Colombia, while utilities were collected from the literature. The analysis was carried out from a societal perspective. Results The model showed that MS for treating pediatric patient with acute asthma, was associated with lower total cost than standard therapy (US $1149 vs US $1598 average cost per patient), and higher QALYs ( 0.60 vs 0.52 average per patient); showing dominance. the probabilty that MS provides a more cost-effective use of resources compared with standard therapy exceeds 99% for all willingness to pay thresholds Conclusion MS in emergency settings was cost-effective for the hospital treatment of an infant with asthma moderate or severe. Our study provides evidence that should be used by decision-makers to improve clinical practice guidelines and should be replicated to validate their results in other middle-income countries.