loading page

Pasteurella Multiocida Infection Resulting in a Descending Thoracic Aorta Mycotic Pseudoaneurysm
  • +1
  • Eric JengOrcid,
  • Gianna AcostaOrcid,
  • Tomas Martin,
  • Gilbert Upchurch, Jr
Eric Jeng
Orcid
University of Florida Health
Author Profile
Gianna Acosta
Orcid
University of Florida Health
Author Profile
Tomas Martin
University of Florida Health
Author Profile
Gilbert Upchurch, Jr
University of Florida Health
Author Profile

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

03 May 2020Submitted to Journal of Cardiac Surgery
11 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
11 May 2020Assigned to Editor
23 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
26 May 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
30 May 20201st Revision Received
02 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
02 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
02 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
05 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Accept

Abstract

Title: Pasteurella Multiocida Infection Resulting in a Descending Thoracic Aorta Mycotic Pseudoaneurysm Objective: Highlight our management of a P. Multiocida infected descending thoracic aorta mycotic pseudoaneurysm Methods: Report a case of canine bite resulting in a P. Multiocida descending thoracic aorta mycotic pseudoaneurysm Results: We present a 61-year-old gentleman who was initially seen in an Emergency Department after a canine bite. He was admitted and treated with a course of IV antibiotics for P. Multiocida bacteremia and discharged. Three weeks post discharge, he continued to feel generalized malaise and work-up was significant for a descending thoracic aorta mycotic pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent a low left posterior lateral thoracotomy and femoral-femoral cardiopulmonary bypass for complete resection and replacement with a 24 mm GelweaveTM graft (Terumo Cardiovascular Group, Ann Arbor, Michigan). Given purulence and gross infection we planned for a staged approach, with a secondary washout and omental flap for biologic coverage of the graft. The patient did well clinically and was discharged at 14 days to rehabilitation with six-week intravenous course of antibiotics. Conclusions: The patient’s clinical course with subsequent follow-up suggest that complete resection of the mycotic pseudoaneurysm, followed by omental flap coverage is a viable strategy to manage mycotic aortic infections with virulent organisms.