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Detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and theileriosis in livestock, Madhya Pradesh, Central India
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  • Manjunathachar Vasanthachar,
  • Chandrashekar Raut,
  • Prakash Tewari,
  • Vivek Chouksey,
  • Pradip Barde,
  • Pragya Yadav,
  • Ravendra Sharma,
  • Aparup Das
Manjunathachar Vasanthachar
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Chandrashekar Raut
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Prakash Tewari
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Vivek Chouksey
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Pradip Barde
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Pragya Yadav
National Institute of Virology
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Ravendra Sharma
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Aparup Das
ICMR-National Institute of Research in Tribal Health
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Abstract

Tick borne diseases impinge veterinary and public health, worldwide causing threat to nutritional security, mortality and huge economic losses. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and theileriosis are the two important tick-borne diseases in humans and animals respectively, risk the public health due to mortality and pose major threat to animal husbandry and livestock industries. Sero-epidemiological and genetic analysis are the key aspects in determining the prevalence of CCHF virus (CCHFV) circulation and molecular prevalence of theileriosis in region wise, which are overlooked in the India, where the country known for largest cattle population, globally. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate the prevalence of CCHFV in animals and genetic diversity of the prevailing Theileria annulata in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. Systematically, livestock population was screened for presence of CCHFV antibodies and T. annulata through commercial IgG ELISA kits and PCR, respectively. Overall, 16% of samples (n=63/393) tested were positive for CCHFV-specific IgG antibodies and 15.9% (n-21/132) animals were positive for T. annulata infections, respectively. It indicates that, CCHFV is circulating in this region in an unnoticed hidden manner. It recommends that, screening of human cases showing hemorrhagic manifestations in health care setup and active surveillance of ticks as a preparedness to combat future outbreaks. Moreover, designing region wise preventive strategic plan may curb these emerging as well as economic tick-borne diseases.