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Successful Coronary Artery Bypass Operation in a SARS-COV-2 Infected Patient with Acute Coronary Syndrome
  • Srikanth Yandrapalli,
  • Howard Cooper,
  • Ramin Malekan
Srikanth Yandrapalli
Westchester Medical Center
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Howard Cooper
Westchester Medical Center
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Ramin Malekan
Westchester Medical Center
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Peer review status:ACCEPTED

30 May 2020Submitted to Journal of Cardiac Surgery
30 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
30 May 2020Assigned to Editor
30 May 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
30 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
30 May 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
30 May 20201st Revision Received
01 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
01 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
01 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
01 Jun 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
01 Jun 2020Editorial Decision: Accept

Abstract

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is overwhelming healthcare resources and infrastructure worldwide. Cardiac surgical operating capacity during the COVID-19 pandemic is dramatically lower due to postponement or cancellation of elective or semi-urgent procedures. Earlier reports have demonstrated complicated post-operative courses and high fatality rates in patients undergoing emergent cardiothoracic surgery who were diagnosed post-operatively with COVID-19. These reports raise the possibility that active COVID-19 might precipitate a catastrophic pathophysiogical response to infection in the post-operative period and lead to unfavorable surgical outcomes. Hence, it is imperative to screen patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection prior to surgery and to carefully monitor them in the post-operative period to identify any early signs of active COVID-19. In this report, we present the successful outcome of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operation in a patient with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection presenting with an acute coronary syndrome and requiring urgent surgical intervention. We employed a meticulous strategy to identify subclinical COVID-19 disease, and after confirming the absence of active disease, proceeded with the CABG operation. The patient outcome was successful with the absence of any overt COVID-19 manifestations in the post-operative period.