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Forest allocation, benefit sharing, and management practice in the KOBO community forest among the Sheka peopleΟΕΟ
  • getaneh HaileOrcid
getaneh Haile
Orcid
Jigjiga University
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Abstract

Sheka people dependency on the Sheka forest has made the people of Sheka create various techniques and strategies that are used to manage the Sheka forest. In the indigenous culture of Sheka people, there is a great deal of forest allocation, benefit sharing, and management practice. Locally, these forests are known as KOBO. This is clearly reflected in the KOBO forest allocation, benefit sharing, and management culture. A framework based on ethnographic information is proposed in this paper; accordingly, qualitative indicators are suggested for different variables relating to indigenous forest allocation, benefit sharing, and management practice among the Sheka people. In Sheka culture, the clan leader (Gebi tato) allocates forests to each member of the clan in the village. The management of the KOBO forest is the responsibility of the individual KOBO holders. All members of the clan who have the KOBO forest are entitled to get a share of the benefits that are derived from the use of the KOBO forests. The KOBO forest is the principal source of honey for the Sheka people. The production of quality honey from the KOBO forest creates a huge market demand within and outside the Sheka zone. In addition to the production of honey, the KOBO forest is used for the extraction of trees for house building and another household consumption. The paper concludes that the current KOBO forest allocation, benefit sharing, and management practices could substantially enhance sustainable forest management and social and economic development of the Sheka people.ΟΕΖΠΠ