loading page

BRIGHT IDEAS PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS TRAINING FOR CAREGIVERS OF CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE: A TWO-SITE PILOT FEASIBILITY TRIAL
  • +2
  • Melissa Young,
  • Megan Voll,
  • Robert Noll,
  • Diane Fairclough,
  • Catherine Flanagan-Priore
Melissa Young
Hospital for Sick Children
Author Profile
Megan Voll
University of Pittsburgh
Author Profile
Robert Noll
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh
Author Profile
Diane Fairclough
Colorado School of Public Health
Author Profile
Catherine Flanagan-Priore
John R Oishei Children's Hospital
Author Profile

Peer review status:IN REVISION

09 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
09 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
09 Jun 2020Submitted to Pediatric Blood & Cancer
11 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
06 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
07 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major

Abstract

Bright IDEAS Problem-Solving Skills Training (BI) is an evidence-based behavioral intervention that has been utilized extensively with caregivers of children recently diagnosed with cancer. Considerable evidence has shown that BI is acceptable to caregivers and improvements in problem-solving skills mediate reduced symptoms of distress; and it is most effective with single, minority caregivers. A slightly modified version of BI was offered to caregivers of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in a two-site pilot feasibility trial. BI was modified to reduce barriers to care, logistical challenges, and stigma associated with receiving behavioral health services. Our goal was to establish high rates of recruitment and retention amongst caregivers of children with SCD. Recruitment was acceptable (94%; N = 72) and retention reasonable (48.6%) across both sites with 35 caregivers successfully completing the BI program. Results showed that caregivers of children with SCD, who successfully completed the BI program reported, significant improvements in problem-solving skills immediately and three months post-intervention completion. Interestingly, initial levels of distress were low with few caregivers reporting clinically significant levels of distress; distress remained low over time. Findings are discussed in the context of psychosocial screening and assumptions regarding caregivers of children with SCD.