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Use of virtual reality in medical obstetrical education; a quasi-experimental design
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  • Vera Arents,
  • Pieter de Groot,
  • Veerle Struben,
  • Karlijn van Stralen
Vera Arents
Spaarne Gasthuis
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Pieter de Groot
Spaarne Gasthuis
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Veerle Struben
Spaarne Gasthuis
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Karlijn van Stralen
Spaarne Gasthuis
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Abstract

Objective: Video-based teaching has been part of medical education for some time. We investigated if an additional 3D video to the curriculum leads to an improvement of long-term recall of knowledge regarding situation, procedure and organisation. Design quasi-experimental design Setting: Sequential gynaecology residency teaching groups had or had no access to a VR-video of a gentle caesarean section (CS). Sample: 41 medical students participated in the VR group and 48 in the conventional study group. Methods: After 6 weeks of residency, knowledge was assessed with an open and multiple choice questionnaire. Main outcome measures: General obstetric and specific CS related knowledge and happiness with the use of VR glasses Results: 3D video did not result in a difference in either specific or general knowledge retention between the VR group and the conventional study group. However 83.4% of the VR-group reported that more videos should be used in future to prepare for surgical procedures. In the VR group 56.7% reported side effects like nausea or dizziness. After adjustment for the number of attended CSs, students in the VR group stated less often (p=0.04) that they would have liked to attend more real-life CSs as compared to the conventional study group. Conclusion: Even though the use of VR did not increase knowledge, it did provide a partial alternative for attending a real CS. In case only few possibilities to attend a CS are available, VR might provide an alternative. Funding: Spaarne Gasthuis innovation fund