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Function and therapeutic potential of GPCRs in epididymis
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  • Daolai Zhang,
  • Yanfei Wang,
  • Hui Lin,
  • Yujing Sun,
  • Mingwei Wang,
  • Yingli Jia,
  • Xiao Yu,
  • Hui Jiang,
  • Wenming Xu,
  • Zhigang Xu,
  • Jinpeng Sun
Daolai Zhang
Binzhou Medical University - Yantai Campus
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Yanfei Wang
Shandong University School of Life Science
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Hui Lin
Shandong University School of Medicine
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Yujing Sun
Shandong University School of Medicine
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Mingwei Wang
Shandong University School of Medicine
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Yingli Jia
Peking University School of Basic Medical Sciences
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Xiao Yu
Shandong University
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Hui Jiang
Peking University Third Hospital
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Wenming Xu
Sichuan University West China Second University Hospital
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Zhigang Xu
Shandong University School of Life Science
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Jinpeng Sun
shandong University
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Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

20 Jun 2020Submitted to British Journal of Pharmacology
23 Jun 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Jun 2020Submission Checks Completed
26 Jun 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned

Abstract

Infertility rates for both females and males have increased continuously in recent years. Currently, effective treatments for male infertility with defined mechanisms or targets are still lacking. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of drug targets, but their functions and the implications on therapeutic development for male infertility largely remain elusive. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that several members of the GPCR superfamily play crucial roles in the maintenance of ion-water homeostasis of the epididymis, development of the efferent ductules, formation of the blood-epididymal barrier, and maturation of sperm. Knowledge of the functions, genetic variations, and working mechanisms of such GPCRs, along with the drugs and ligands relevant to their specific functions, provide future directions and elicit great arsenal for potential therapy development for treating male infertility.