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Population genomics Reveals PRDM16 underpins the cold tolerance in domestic Cattle
  • +14
  • Chunlong Yan,
  • Jun Lin,
  • Yuanyuan Huang,
  • Qingshan Gao,
  • Zhengyu Piao,
  • Shouli Yuan,
  • Li Chen,
  • Xue Ren,
  • Rongcai Ye,
  • Meng Dong,
  • Hanlin Zhang,
  • Huiqiao Zhou,
  • Xiaoxiao Jiang,
  • Xiangnan Wu,
  • Wanzhu Jin,
  • Xuming Zhou,
  • Changguo Yan
Chunlong Yan
Yanbian University
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Yuanyuan Huang
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Qingshan Gao
Yanbian University
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Zhengyu Piao
Yanbian University
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Shouli Yuan
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Xue Ren
Annoroad Gene Technology Co. Ltd
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Rongcai Ye
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Hanlin Zhang
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Huiqiao Zhou
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Xiaoxiao Jiang
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Xiangnan Wu
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Wanzhu Jin
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Xuming Zhou
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Changguo Yan
Yanbian University
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Peer review status:POSTED

02 Jul 2020Submitted to Molecular Ecology
02 Jul 2020Assigned to Editor
02 Jul 2020Submission Checks Completed

Abstract

Environmental temperature serves a major driver for adaptive changes in wild organisms, however, its role in domestication has been less characterized. To uncover the mechanisms of cold tolerance in domestic animals, we sequenced genomes of 28 cattle at median coverage from warm and cold areas across China. By characterizing the population structure and demographic history, we identified two genetic clusters, i.e., northern and southern cattle groups, and a common historic population peak at 30 kilo years ago. Genome scan of cold tolerant breeds revealed genes that under selection sweeps enriched in thermogenesis related pathways. Specifically, we determined a substitution of PRDM16 (p.P779L) in north cattle, which maintains the formation of brown adipocytes through boosting expression of thermogenic related genes, indicating a vital role of this gene in cold tolerance. The findings provide a basis of genetic variations in domestic cattle that shaped by temperature environments and highlight a role of reverse mutation in livestock species.