Selen Ilhan Alp

and 2 more

Aim: We aimed to evaluate the association of premature ejaculation with OSAS and to assess the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on premature ejaculation. Methods: Sexually active men between the ages of 20-50 who were newly diagnosed with PE, and diagnosed with OSAS were included in the study. Arabic Premature Ejaculation Index (AIPE) and Intravaginal Ejection Delay Time (IELT) were questioned for the diagnosis of PE. Patients with OSAS who accepted to participate in the study were given one year CPAP treatment, and AIPE and IELT were questioned again, after the treatment. Results: Epworth score was significantly lower in the control group compared with the OSAS groups. In the beginning, IELT and AIPE scores were significantly higher in the control group compared with the OSAS groups. At the end of the treatment, in both OSAS groups, both sores improved. Conclusion: For the first time in literature we determined that the presence of OSAS was associated with significantly worse IELT and AIPE scores in males with PE, and the treatment of OSAS was related to the significant improvement in both scores, in the absence of any specific treatments for PE. -What’s already known? -The pathology of OSAS depends on repeated episodes of hypoxia during sleep that may result in cyclic changes in arterial oxygen saturation and increased production of reactive oxygen species. Higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction and erectile dysfunction was reported in OSAS patients. -What does this article add? -To the best of our knowledge first time in the literature we determined that the presence of OSAS was associated with significantly worse IELT and AIPE scores in males with PE, and the treatment of OSAS was related to the significant improvement in both scores, in the absence of any specific treatments for PE

Hakan Celikhisar

and 2 more

Abstract Objective: To evaluate whether smoking cessation has an effect on female sexual function and quality of life. Methodology: After approval by the local ethics committee, smoking and non-smoking female participants were included in the study and all participants filled the female sexual function index (FSFI) and the short form 36 (SF-36). The same questionnaires were filled again at the 9th month control after smoking cessation. The scores of these questionnaires were compared between the groups. In addition, the FSFI and SF-36 scores of the participants in the smoking group were also compared with the scores at the 9th month after smoking cessation. Results: The rate of FSD was significantly higher in the smoking group when compared with control group (86.0% vs 32.5%; p<0,001). The FSFI total and sub domains score was significantly lower in the smoking group when compared control group [21.5 (min:14.4-max:28.69) and 28.9 (min:17.7-max:32.8); p<0.001 respectively]. The rate of FSD was significantly decreased after nine months smoking cessation (86% to 35.1%; p<0.001). After smoking cessation significant improvements on FSFI total and sub-domain scores and SF-36 sub-domain scores were determined. Conclusion: In this study, it was shown that smoking negatively affected FSD and QOL when compared to healthy non-smoking women, and smoking cessation caused significant improvements in FSFI and SF-36 scores in these women after 9 months. Keywords: female sexual dysfunction, female sexual function index, smoking cessation, the Short Form 36, quality of life.