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Resident Perception of Standardization and Credentialing for High Risk Bedside Procedures in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Results from an Institutional Pilot Study
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  • Olugbenga Okusanya,
  • Alexandrea Bartow,
  • Edgar Aranda-Michel,
  • Angela Kinnunen,
  • Matthew Schuchert,
  • Arman Kilic,
  • Pablo Sanchez,
  • Rajeev Dhupar,
  • James Luketich,
  • Ibrahim Sultan
Olugbenga Okusanya
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Alexandrea Bartow
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Edgar Aranda-Michel
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Angela Kinnunen
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Matthew Schuchert
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Arman Kilic
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Pablo Sanchez
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Rajeev Dhupar
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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James Luketich
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System
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Ibrahim Sultan
University of Pittsburgh
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Abstract

Objectives: Though guidelines are set by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery for the operative cases that cardiothoracic surgery residents must perform to be board-eligible, no such recommendations exist to assess competency for the wide range of high-risk bedside procedures. Our department created and implemented a multi-disciplinary developed course designed to standardize common high-risk bedside procedures and credential our residents. The aim of this study was to survey the attitudes of residents to and query the efficacy of such a course. Methods: The course was designed with the goal of standardizing endotracheal intubation, arterial line insertion (radial and femoral), central venous line insertion, pigtail tube thoracostomy and nasogastric tube placement. The course consisted of an online module followed by a 4-hour hands on simulation session. Knowledge based pre and post evaluations were administered as well as Likert based survey regarding multiple aspects of the residents’ perceptions of the course and the procedures. Results: Twenty-three (7 traditional and 16 integrated) cardiothoracic surgical residents participated in the course. Residents reported that 48% of the time, bedside procedures were historically taught by other trainees rather than faculty. All residents endorsed increased standardization of all procedures after the course. Likewise, residents showed increased confidence in all procedures except for pigtail and thoracentesis as well as nasogastric tube placement. 43.5% of the participants demonstrated improvement in the pre and post-test knowledge-based evaluations. ConclusionCardiothoracic residents have favorable attitudes towards standardization and credentialing for high risk bedside procedures and utilizing such courses may help standardize procedural techniques.

Peer review status:Published

06 May 2020Submitted to Journal of Cardiac Surgery
07 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
07 May 2020Assigned to Editor
08 May 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 May 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
26 May 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
28 May 20201st Revision Received
29 May 2020Submission Checks Completed
29 May 2020Assigned to Editor
06 Jul 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
21 Jul 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
21 Jul 2020Editorial Decision: Accept
09 Sep 2020Published in Journal of Cardiac Surgery. 10.1111/jocs.15007