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Yangzhou Wang

and 5 more

Diapause is an adaptive dormancy strategy by which arthropods endure extended periods of adverse climatic conditions. Seasonal variation in larval diapause initiation and duration in Ostrinia furnacalis influences adult mating generation number (voltinism) across different local environments. The degree of mating period overlap between sympatric voltine ecotypes influence hybridization level, but impacts on O. furnacalis population genetic structure and evolution of divergent adaptive phenotypes remains uncertain. Genetic differentiation was estimated between voltine ecotypes collected from 8 locations. Mitochondrial haplotypes were significantly different between historically allopatric univoltine and bivoltine locations. Haplotypes from sympatric locations were clustered more-closely to bivoltine locations, but influenced by local demographics. Additionally, analyses of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes implicate voltinism, as opposed to geographic distance, as contributing to low, but significant levels of variation among voltine ecotypes. Regardless, only 11 of 257 SNP loci were predicted to be under selection, suggesting population genetic homogenization except at loci proximal to factors putatively responsible for locally adaptive or voltinism-specific traits. These findings provide evidence that divergent voltine ecotypes may be maintained in allopatric and sympatric areas despite relatively high rates of nuclear gene flow, yet influence of voltinism on maintenance of observed haplotype divergence remains unresolved.

Gabrielle French

and 2 more

Objective: Minimally Invasive Ponto Surgery (MIPS) is a type of bone anchored hearing system performed through a puncture hole that has been reported to minimize soft tissue trauma, decrease operative time, and have favorable outcomes. Due to it being a relatively new procedure there remains a paucity of pediatric outcomes data. Our objective was to study MIPS outcomes in the pediatric population. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: The study was performed at two tertiary pediatric otolaryngology centres between 2016-2019. Participants: Pediatric patients from two tertiary pediatric otolaryngology clinics who underwent MIPS between 2016-2019. Main Outcome Measures: Outcomes included indication for surgery, implant and abutment type, overlying skin thickness, skin-to-skin time, Holgers score at three, six and twelve months, revision surgery and time to abutment fitting. Results and Conclusions: Fourteen patients, two with bilateral procedures met inclusion criteria (mean age= 8.07 ± 2.87years). The main etiology for the hearing loss was microtia (64%). The mean overlying skin thickness was 5.13 ± 3.18mm. Across all visits, 9.44% had Holger’s scores >2, which is classified as an adverse skin reaction. One of these patients required surgery to address skin overgrowth. One implant loss (6.3%) was reported, but found to be in the setting of trauma. Mean MIPS Skin to skin times were found to be 12.4 ± 2.6 minutes, markedly different that the Baha® Attract and Connect found to be 56 and 53 minutes respectively. This study represents the largest pediatric MIPS cohort to date, and our results are similar to published adult studies.

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Gary Ghahremani

and 2 more

Summary Background: Torus is a protuberant and lobulated exostosis that develops on the lingual aspect of the jaws or hard palate in 10-30% of adults. They can interfere with mastication, speech, oral hygiene, and denture placement. Their enlargement with advancing age may also lead to superficial ulceration, inflammation, osteonecrosis and various other complications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the authors’ experience with 17 adults who had large symptomatic tori was performed. The patients were examined by intraoral imaging and radiographic or computed tomography of their maxillofacial bones. Their dental and medical records were reviewed along with the pertinent literature concerning the prevalence and reported complications of this entity. Results: This series included 6 men and 11 women, ranging in age from 36 to 85 years (Mean age: 56.5 years).There were 6 patients with torus mandibularis, 8 with torus palatinus, and 3 with torus maxillaris. Four of our 17 patients required surgical excision of their tori because of large size, recurrent superficial erosions and associated symptoms. Conclusion: The majority of tori are asymptomatic and incidental finding, but the more prominent tori are prone to mucosal inflammation and ulceration that may require surgical removal of the lesion. Large tori can also interfere with mastication, speech, dental hygiene, placement and function of prosthetic dentures, and may cause snoring, sleep apnea or other complications. Therefore, the practicing physicians should be familiar with the appearance, radiological features, clinical implications and management of tori.

Wahaj Munir

and 3 more

Background: Acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD), is a surgical emergency often requiring intervention on the aortic root. There is much controversy regarding root management; aggressively pursuing a root replacement, versus more conservative approaches to preserve native structures. Methods: Electronic database search we performed through PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, google scholar and Cochrane identifying studies that reported on outcomes of surgical repair of ATAAD through either root preservation or replacement. The identified articles focused on short- and long-term mortalities, and rates of re-operation on the aortic root. Results: There remains controversy on replacing or preserving aortic root in ATAAD. Current evidence supports practice of both trends following an extensive decision-making framework, with conflicting series suggesting favourable results with both procedures as the approach that best defines higher survival rates and lower perioperative complications. Yet, the decision to perform either approach remains surgeon decision and bound to the extent of the dissection and tear entries in strong correlation with status of the aortic valve and involvement of coronaries in the dissection. Conclusions: There exists much controversy regarding fate of the aortic root in ATAAD. There are conflicting studies for impact of root replacement on mortality, whilst some study’s report no significant results at all. There is strong evidence regarding risk of re-operation being greater when root is not replaced. Majority of these studies are limited by the single centred, retrospective nature of these small sample sized cohorts, further hindered by potential of treatment bias.

Matthew Sussman

and 9 more

The recognition of fibrinolysis phenotypes in trauma patients has led to a reevaluation of antifibrinolytic therapy (AF). Many cardiac patients also receive AF, however the distribution of fibrinolytic phenotypes in that population is unknown. The purpose of this study was to fill that gap. Methods: Data were retrospectively reviewed from 78 cardiac surgery patients. Phenotypes were defined as hypofibrinolytic (LY30 <0.8%), physiologic (LY30 0.8-3.0%) and hyperfibrinolytic (LY30 >3%). Continuous variables were expressed as M ± SD or median (interquartile range). Results: The study population was 65±10 yrs old, 74% male, average body mass index of 29±5 kg/m2. Fibrinolytic phenotypes were distributed as physiologic=45%, hypo=32% and hyper = 23%. There was no obvious effect of age, gender, race, or ethnicity on the distribution of fibrinolysis phenotypes; 47% received AF. The time with chest tube during post-operative recovery was longer in those who received AF (4[3,5] days) vs no AF (3[2,4] days), P=0.037). All cause morbidity occurred in 51% of patients who received AF vs 25% with no AF (p=0.017). However, with AF vs no AF, apparent differences in median chest tube output (1379 vs 820ml, p=0.075), hospital LOS (13 vs 10 days, P=0.873), estimated blood loss (1100 vs 775 ml, P=0.127), units of transfused RBCs (4 vs 2], P=0.152) or all-cause mortality (5.4% [2/37] vs 10% [4/41], P=0.518) were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This is the first description of three distinctly different fibrinolytic phenotypes in cardiac surgery patients. In this population, the use of AF was associated with increased morbidity.

Arushi Singh

and 6 more

Background: Ibrutinib is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), though echocardiographic predictors of AF have not been studied in this population. We sought to determine whether left atrial (LA) strain on transthoracic echocardiography could identify patients at risk for developing ibrutinib-related atrial fibrillation (IRAF). Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 66 patients who had an echocardiogram prior to ibrutinib treatment. LA strain was measured with TOMTEC Imaging Systems, obtaining peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS) and peak atrial contraction strain (PACS) on 4-chamber and 2-chamber views. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-square analysis, T-test, or binomial regression analysis, with a p-value < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: Twenty-two patients developed IRAF (33%). Age at initiation of ibrutinib was significantly associated with IRAF (65.1 years vs. 74.1 years, p = 0.002). Mean ibrutinib dose was lower among patients who developed IRAF (388.2 ± 121.7 vs. 448.6 ± 88.4, p = 0.025). E/e’ was significantly higher among patients who developed IRAF (11.5 vs. 9.3, p = 0.04). PALS was significantly lower in patients who developed AF (30.3% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.01). On multivariate regression analysis, age, PALS and PACS were significantly associated with IRAF. On multivariate regression analysis, only PACS remained significantly associated with IRAF while accounting for age. Conclusions: Age, ibrutinib dose, E/e’, and PALS on pre-treatment echocardiogram were significantly associated with development of IRAF. On multivariate regression analyses, age, PALS and PACS remained significantly associated with IRAF. Impaired LA mechanics add to the assessment of patients at risk for IRAF

Lacin Cevhertas

and 21 more

James Hummel

and 1 more

We thank Medina et al. for their interest in our recent work on QTc prolongation associated with treatment of COVID-19 patients with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. As they appropriately point out in their letter, genetic variation is likely a significant determinant of QT prolongation in the population at large and in COVID-19 patients specifically. While drugs causing acquired long QT syndrome and torsades de pointes are generally blockers of IKr, repolarization results from the aggregate of multiple inward and outward currents. Patients with sub-clinical defects in any of these ion channels can have normal or only slightly prolonged baseline QT intervals, but may possess decreased repolarization reserve leading to an exaggerated response to IKr blockade (1).  In our study, a baseline QTc of > 460 ms was associated with excessive QTc prolongation, and this likely represents a group of patients with sub-clinical cardiac ion channel mutations (so called “first hit”) (2). We also agree that many patients with latent mutations demonstrate a normal baseline QT, which gets prolonged with the addition of a drug or a change in the clinical condition “second hit” (3). The patients in our study who exhibited QTc prolongation were generally acutely ill, and displayed “multiple hits” that led to QTc prolongation and it is certainly plausible that many may have had sub-clinical cardiac ion mutations. We therefore wholeheartedly agree that pharmacogenetics should be considered in studies of drug-induced QT prolongation, however this information is rarely available to include for acutely ill patients. And while it makes sense to obtain genetic profiles prior to administration of QT-prolonging medications, that can only be performed in the elective outpatient setting, while taking into consideration medical, ethical and social issues related to asymptomatic genetic screening (e.g. cost, reimbursement, informed consent, etc…). There is significant interest in building genomic databases, and when this becomes a reality for the population at large we believe that genetic information should certainly be included in studies of QT prolongation.Roden DM Long QT syndrome: reduced repolarization reserve and the genetic link. J Intern Med. 2006 Jan; 259(1):59-69.Napolitano C, Schwartz PJ, Brown AM, et al. Evidence for a cardiac ion channel mutation underlying drug-induced QT prolongation and life-threatening arrhythmias. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2000;11:691–6Sauer AJ and Newton-Cheh C. Clinical and genetic determinants of torsade de pointes risk. Circulation. 2012;125:1684-94.

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