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Lung ultrasound in the diagnosis and monitoring of 30 children with Coronavirus Disease 2019
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  • Anna Musolino,
  • Maria Supino,
  • Danilo Buonsenso,
  • Raffaele Papa,
  • Sara Chiurchiu',
  • Andrea Magistrelli,
  • Maria Barbieri,
  • Massimiliano Raponi,
  • Patrizia D'Argenio,
  • Alberto Villani,
  • paolo toma
Anna Musolino
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Maria Supino
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Danilo Buonsenso
University Hospital Agostino Gemelli
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Raffaele Papa
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Sara Chiurchiu'
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Andrea Magistrelli
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Maria Barbieri
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Massimiliano Raponi
Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù
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Patrizia D'Argenio
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Alberto Villani
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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paolo toma
Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital
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Abstract

Background: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is causing of the new global pandemic and is responsible for millions of infections and thousands of deaths in the world. The lung ultrasound is a non-invasive and easily repeatable tool and can be carried out by the pediatrician at the bedside of children with a consequent reduction in the risk of transmission of the virus. Objective: To determine whether the lung ultrasound is a useful tool in identifying the signs of lung involvement in children with COVID-19 and whether can monitor the course of the disease. Methods: The study was made in the emergency department in a tertiary level pediatric hospital. All patients with swab-confirmed COVID-19 infection were subjected a lung ultrasound within 6 hours from admission and after 96 hours. Results: Among a total of 30 children, 18 (60%) were males, 4 reported exertional dyspnea and only 1 chest pain. The mean oxygen saturation was 98.8 ± 1.0 % in ambient air in emergency department and no patient needed oxygen therapy during hospitalization. After 96 hours we had observed ultrasound abnormality al the lung ultrasound only in 20% of the children. We found a statistically significant reduction in pleural irregularities (30% vs 16.7; p: .001) and in B lines (50% vs 20%; p: .008). Conclusions: lung ultrasound is safe and useful tool in detecting lung involvement in children with COVID-19 and in monitoring these patients during the course of disease.

Peer review status:Published

23 Sep 2020Submitted to Pediatric Pulmonology
30 Sep 2020Submission Checks Completed
30 Sep 2020Assigned to Editor
09 Oct 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
29 Oct 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
31 Oct 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
06 Dec 20201st Revision Received
07 Dec 2020Assigned to Editor
07 Dec 2020Submission Checks Completed
07 Dec 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
14 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
15 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
16 Dec 20202nd Revision Received
17 Dec 2020Submission Checks Completed
17 Dec 2020Assigned to Editor
17 Dec 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
22 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
24 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Accept
May 2021Published in Pediatric Pulmonology volume 56 issue 5 on pages 1045-1052. 10.1002/ppul.25255