loading page

Spatial and temporal variation in the generation time of a bird metapopulation: density regulation and the evolutionary potential of a pace-of-life measure
  • +8
  • Yimen Araya-Ajoy,
  • Alina Niskanen,
  • Peter Ranke,
  • Hannah Froy,
  • Thomas Kvalnes,
  • Bernt Rønning,
  • Michael Pedersen,
  • Thor-Harald Ringsby,
  • Henrik Jensen,
  • Bernt-Erik Sæther,
  • Jonathan Wright
Yimen Araya-Ajoy
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Alina Niskanen
University of Oulu
Author Profile
Peter Ranke
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Hannah Froy
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Thomas Kvalnes
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Bernt Rønning
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Michael Pedersen
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Thor-Harald Ringsby
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Henrik Jensen
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Author Profile
Bernt-Erik Sæther
Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics
Author Profile
Jonathan Wright
NTNU
Author Profile

Abstract

Generation time determines the pace of key demographic and evolutionary processes. Quantified as the weighted mean age at reproduction, it can be studied as a trait that varies within and among populations and may evolve in response to ecological conditions. We combined quantitative genetic analyses with age- and density-dependent models to study generation time variation in a bird metapopulation. Generation time was heritable, and males had longer generation times compared with females. Individuals with longer generation times had a higher lifetime reproductive success but not a higher expected population growth rate. Density regulation acted on recruit production, suggesting that longer generation times should be favored when populations are closer to carrying capacity. Furthermore, generation times were shorter when populations were growing, and longer when populations were closer to equilibrium or declining. These results support classic theory predicting that density regulation is an important driver of the pace of life-history strategies.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

19 Nov 2020Submitted to Ecology Letters
20 Nov 2020Submission Checks Completed
20 Nov 2020Assigned to Editor
23 Nov 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
23 Dec 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
28 Dec 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Major
20 Apr 20211st Revision Received
21 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
21 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
22 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
22 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
22 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
14 May 20212nd Revision Received
17 May 2021Assigned to Editor
17 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
24 May 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
24 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept