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Core outcome sets (COS) related to pregnancy and childbirth: a systematic review
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  • Marie Österberg,
  • Christel Hellberg,
  • AnnKristine Jonsson,
  • Sara Fundell,
  • Frida Trönnberg,
  • Alkistis Skalkidou,
  • Maria Jonsson
Marie Österberg
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Christel Hellberg
Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden
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AnnKristine Jonsson
Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden
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Sara Fundell
Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services, Stockholm, Sweden
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Frida Trönnberg
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Alkistis Skalkidou
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Maria Jonsson
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Uppsala, SE
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Abstract

Background: Systematic reviews of clinical trials frequently reveal heterogeneity in the number and types of outcomes reported. To counteract this, a Core Outcome Set (COS) may be applied. Objectives: A systematic review of all completed and ongoing COS related to pregnancy and childbirth Search strategy: COMET up to January 2020, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Academic Search Elite, CINAHL and SocINDEX up to June 2019. Selection criteria: Studies which prioritized outcomes using some form of consensus method (such as the Delphi technique) were included. Data collection and analysis: All included studies were checked for compliance with the Core Outcome Set–STAndards for Reporting. Information about population, setting, method and outcomes was extracted. Main results: Nineteen completed studies and thirty-nine ongoing studies were included. The number of outcomes included in various COS ranged from 6 to 48. Most COS were for conditions related to physical complications during pregnancy. No COS were identified for perinatal mental health. Conclusion: This review discloses a growing number of COS within the field of pregnancy and childbirth. Many of the completed studies follow the proposed reporting. However, several of the COS included a large number of outcomes. There is a need to consider the number of outcomes which may be included in a COS while retaining its applicability in future research. Funding This article is adapted from a report undertaken by the SBU, who provided funding for the study. Keywords: Childbirth, Core outcome set, Maternal health, Obstetric care, Pregnancy