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Factors influencing cartilage tympanic perforation repair in children.
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  • François SIMON,
  • Briac Thierry,
  • Tioka Rabeony,
  • Florian Verrier,
  • Caroline Elie,
  • Natalie Loundon,
  • Nicolas Leboulanger,
  • Vincent Couloigner,
  • Erea-Noël Garabédian,
  • Françoise Denoyelle
François SIMON
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Briac Thierry
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Tioka Rabeony
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Florian Verrier
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Caroline Elie
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Natalie Loundon
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Nicolas Leboulanger
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Vincent Couloigner
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Erea-Noël Garabédian
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Françoise Denoyelle
Necker-Enfants Malades Hospitals
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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify factors that could influence the repair of eardrum perforation using cartilage graft (or cartilage tympanoplasty) in children. Methods: A cohort of children operated on between January 1998 and December 2012 was reviewed. We have studied the repair rate of the eardrum (anatomical result) and the hearing level with audiometric tests (functional result) at 1 year and 3 years after surgery. These results were correlated with size or location of the perforation, status of the contralateral ear, gender, allergies, cleft palate, craniofacial anomalies, expertise of the surgeon (junior, senior) and perioperative observations (mucosa, glue, etc.). Results: 1240 tympanoplasties were selected from the database, of which 139 ears (127 patients) could be analysed (perforation without concurrent disease, authorisation from patients obtained and sufficient information reported). Mean age at surgery was 9.6 years ± 2.6 (range 4-16). At one year, 129/139 (93%) tympanic membranes were closed and 112/139 (81%) were satisfactory (no residual perforation, nor retraction, cholesteatoma, myringitis or OME). Air-bone gap was < 20 dB in 102/127 ears (80%). At 3 years, the eardrum was closed in 64/66 (97%) ears (reperforation in one case) and 82% were satisfactory. Myringitis occurred in 5% and 9% of cases at one- and three-year follow-up. Surgery before the age of 8 years was the only risk factor of a non-satisfactory result at one-year follow-up (p = 0.024). Conclusions: Long-term results were satisfactory; the only risk factor was surgery before eight years of age. In the child, long-term yearly follow-up is necessary after tympanic perforation.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

01 Mar 2021Submitted to Clinical Otolaryngology
05 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
05 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
07 Mar 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
16 Mar 20211st Revision Received
17 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
17 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
18 Mar 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
10 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
19 Apr 20212nd Revision Received
21 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
21 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
25 Apr 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
25 Apr 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
26 Apr 20213rd Revision Received
28 Apr 2021Submission Checks Completed
28 Apr 2021Assigned to Editor
05 May 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
08 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept