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SARS-CoV-2 re-positivity within the first 3 months of COVID-19 recovery; probable re-infection
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  • sara sadr,
  • Melika Arab Bafrani,
  • Alireza Abdollahi,
  • SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi,
  • Esmaeil Mohammadnejad,
  • Roghieh Hossienzade,
  • Fereshteh Shahmari Golestan,
  • Zahra Ahmadinejad,
  • Mohammadreza Salehi,
  • Mohammad Javaherian,
  • Elahe kimyaee,
  • Fatemeh Jafari,
  • Fereshteh Ghiasvand
sara sadr
Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences
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Melika Arab Bafrani
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Alireza Abdollahi
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Esmaeil Mohammadnejad
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Roghieh Hossienzade
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Fereshteh Shahmari Golestan
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Zahra Ahmadinejad
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Mohammadreza Salehi
Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex
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Mohammad Javaherian
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Elahe kimyaee
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Fatemeh Jafari
Iran University of Medical Sciences
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Fereshteh Ghiasvand
Tehran University of Medical Sciences
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Abstract

Objectives Possibility of reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 changes our view on herd immunity and vaccination, and can impact worldwide quarantine policies. We performed RT-PCR follow-up studies on recovered patients to assess possible development of reinfections and re-positivity. Method During a 6-month period, 202 PCR-confirmed recovering COVID-19 patients entered this study. Follow-up RT-PCR tests and symptoms assessment were performed one month after the initial Positive results. patients who tested negative were tested again one and three months later. The Serum IgG and IgM levels were measured in the last follow-up session. Results In the first two follow-up sessions, 82 patients continued their participation, of which four patients tasted positive. In the second follow-up 44 patients participated, three of whom tested positive. None of the patients who tested positive in the first and second follow-up session were symptomatic. In the last session, 32 patients were tested and four patients were positive, three of them were mildly symptomatic and all of them were positive for IgG. Conclusion A positive RT-PCR in a recovering patient may represent reinfection. While we did not have the resources to prove reinfection by genetic sequencing of the infective viruses, we believe presence of mild symptoms in the three patients who tested positive over 100 days after becoming asymptomatic, can be diagnosed as reinfection. The IgG may have abated the symptoms of the reinfection, without providing complete protection.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

20 Apr 2021Submitted to Influenza and other respiratory viruses
03 May 2021Assigned to Editor
03 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
16 May 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
29 May 20211st Revision Received
31 May 2021Submission Checks Completed
31 May 2021Assigned to Editor
01 Jun 2021Editorial Decision: Accept