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The occurrence of gummosis on invasive Acacia decurrens after Mount Merapi eruption in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
  • +2
  • Sri Rahayu,
  • Rahman Gilang Pratama,
  • MUHAMMAD ALI IMRON,
  • Januar Mahmud,
  • Widiyanto Dwi Nugroho
Sri Rahayu
Universitas Gadjah Mada
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Rahman Gilang Pratama
Universitas Gadjah Mada
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MUHAMMAD ALI IMRON
Universitas Gadjah Mada
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Januar Mahmud
Universitas Gadjah Mada
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Widiyanto Dwi Nugroho
Universitas Gadjah Mada
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Peer review status:IN REVISION

11 Mar 2020Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
19 Mar 2020Assigned to Editor
19 Mar 2020Submission Checks Completed
25 Mar 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned
30 Apr 2020Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
30 Apr 2020Editorial Decision: Revise Minor

Abstract

1. Gummosis on Acacia decurrens, an invasive tree species, that got established in Merapi Volcano National Park (MVNP) after the eruption of Mount Merapi in 2010 was studied to i) identify the causal organism of the disease, ii) analyze disease symptoms, iii) understand the spatio-temporal distribution of gummosis in the tree population and iv) examine how the disease affects the anatomy of tree wood. 2. Pathological, morphological and molecular studies were used in this studies. 3. Ceratocystis fimbriata was proved to be the causal organism of the disease. The disease spread was probably aided by the ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea sp.) which bores holes on the stem. 4. The disease is noted to spread from the base of the trees, where the ambrosia beetle bores holes first, to the upper part. 5. The number of parenchyma cells in the infected stem was significantly more than in the healthy stem which apparently facilitated water and nutrition transport within the tree helping it to grow normally despite serious gummosis. 6. The management of invasion by A. decurrens in the MVNP area poses a serious challenge due its success as an invader in the volcano impacted area and the threat of the gummosis pathogen spreading to other species both of which will affect the regeneration and establishment of native species and recuperation of the ecosystem.