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Cardiac surgery during SARS COV2 pandemic: when less is more.
  • +13
  • Mohamed Elsaegh,
  • John Yap,
  • Aung Oo,
  • Benjamin Adams,
  • Carmelo DiSalvo,
  • Shirish Ambekar,
  • Alex Shipolini,
  • Shyamsunder Kolvekar,
  • Wael Awad,
  • Kit Wong,
  • David Lawrence,
  • Amir Sheikh,
  • Neil Roberts,
  • Kulvinder Lall,
  • Rakesh Uppal,
  • Stephen Edmondson
Mohamed Elsaegh
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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John Yap
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Aung Oo
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Benjamin Adams
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Carmelo DiSalvo
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Shirish Ambekar
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Alex Shipolini
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Shyamsunder Kolvekar
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Wael Awad
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Kit Wong
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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David Lawrence
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Amir Sheikh
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Neil Roberts
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Kulvinder Lall
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Rakesh Uppal
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Stephen Edmondson
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital
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Abstract

Background: During this SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, there has been unprecedented stress on health care systems, resulting in a change to how services are carried out. The most prominent question for healthcare professionals specialising in cardiac surgery is, should we operate during this pandemic, and to what extent ? Methods: As one of the biggest, specialised cardiac surgery centres in the UK, we researched the available published evidence surrounding this question, to formulate an answer. During this process we considered the potential risks of cardiac surgery during a pandemic on the patients, staff, the healthcare system, and the community. We also considered the immunological aspect of cardiac surgery patients and the risk it entails on them. Results We have discussed the available evidence and consequences of our findings, and we found Patients are subjected to greater risk of catching Covid-19 whilst being in hospital. Patient’s immunity is disrupted for up to 3 months post CPB, which makes them more vulnerable to catch the Covid-19 infection during admission and after discharge. Plus the burden on the whole healthcare system, by using the precious resources and occupying the necessary staff and hospital beds needed during the pandemic surge. Conclusion: Try and minimise cardiac surgery operations down to emergencies or unstable patients who have no other options apart from surgery, particularly during the surge stage of the pandemic. Strictly following structured pathways and protocols, updating relevant protocols with emerging new evidence.