loading page

Shared Decision Making in Adult Strabismus Care
  • +2
  • Ala Paduca,
  • Corina Cardaniuc,
  • Per Olof Lundmark,
  • Jan Richard Bruenech,
  • Eugeniu Beschieru
Ala Paduca
Nicolae Testemiceanu State Medical and Pharmaceutical University
Author Profile
Corina Cardaniuc
Nicolae Testemiceanu State Medical and Pharmaceutical University
Author Profile
Per Olof Lundmark
University of South-Eastern Norway
Author Profile
Jan Richard Bruenech
University of South-Eastern Norway
Author Profile
Eugeniu Beschieru
Nicolae Testemiceanu State Medical and Pharmaceutical University
Author Profile

Abstract

Background: In order to involve patients in collaborative decisions (SDM), they need to know the treatment options and determine the patient’s preferences from the doctors. This process is a must to be evaluated in the Republic of Moldova. Objective: The study’s aim was to evaluate Shared Decision Making in adult strabismus care from both patients’ and physicians’ perspectives. Material and methods: A prospective, transversal study was conducted. Sixty nine adult strabismus patients and their attending physician were asked to fill out the SDM-9 and SDM-9-DOC questionnaires related to their perception of SDM during the entire period of strabismus treatment. After treatment, patients were asked to describe their satisfaction level. Results: All the participants completed the questionnaire (mean age  =  29.7  ±  6.9 years, 49.3% female and 50.7% male). The mean SDM-Q-9 score among the patients was 78.42% (IQR = 75.6–82.2%). The mean SDM-Q-Doc score was 86.7% (IQR 84.4–88.9%). The SDM-Q-Doc values were consistently higher than the SDM-Q-9 values (average difference of 6.7%). Female and yang patients reported a lower SDM score. Pearson correlation test revealed a positive significant correlation between both SDM-Q-9 score and patient satisfaction t (69)= .28, p .02. Conclusions: Our research pointed out blanks in assessing patient information needs as the main obstacles to SDM. Doctors are more confident in their belief that the information provided as well as deliberations and the shared decision process are performed at a high level compared to patients’ expectations. These findings can serve as a springboard to further improve communication and SDM between patients and physicians, thereby raising patient satisfaction.