Authorea Help

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WHAT IS LATEX? LaTeX is a programming language that can be used for writing and typesetting documents. It is especially useful to write mathematical notation such as equations and formulae. HOW TO USE LATEX TO WRITE MATHEMATICAL NOTATION There are three ways to enter “math mode” and present a mathematical expression in LaTeX: 1. _inline_ (in the middle of a text line) 2. as an _equation_, on a separate dedicated line 3. as a full-sized inline expression (_displaystyle_) _inline_ Inline expressions occur in the middle of a sentence. To produce an inline expression, place the math expression between dollar signs ($). For example, typing $E=mc^2$ yields E = mc². _equation_ Equations are mathematical expressions that are given their own line and are centered on the page. These are usually used for important equations that deserve to be showcased on their own line or for large equations that cannot fit inline. To produce an inline expression, place the mathematical expression between the symbols \[! and \verb!\]. Typing \[x=}{2a}\] yields \[x=}{2a}\] _displaystyle_ To get full-sized inline mathematical expressions use \displaystyle. Typing I want this $\displaystyle ^{\infty} {n}$, not this $^{\infty} {n}$. yields: I want this $\displaystyle ^{\infty}{n}$, not this $^{\infty}{n}.$ SYMBOLS (IN _MATH_ MODE) The basics As discussed above math mode in LaTeX happens inside the dollar signs ($...$), inside the square brackets \[...\] and inside equation and displaystyle environments. Here’s a cheatsheet showing what is possible in a math environment: -------------------------- ----------------- --------------- _description_ _command_ _output_ addition + + subtraction - − plus or minus \pm ± multiplication (times) \times × multiplication (dot) \cdot ⋅ division symbol \div ÷ division (slash) / / simple text text infinity \infty ∞ dots 1,2,3,\ldots 1, 2, 3, … dots 1+2+3+\cdots 1 + 2 + 3 + ⋯ fraction {b} ${b}$ square root $$ nth root \sqrt[n]{x} $\sqrt[n]{x}$ exponentiation a^b ab subscript a_b ab absolute value |x| |x| natural log \ln(x) ln(x) logarithms b logab exponential function e^x=\exp(x) ex = exp(x) deg \deg(f) deg(f) degree \degree $\degree$ arcmin ^\prime ′ arcsec ^{\prime\prime} ′′ circle plus \oplus ⊕ circle times \otimes ⊗ equal = = not equal \ne ≠ less than < < less than or equal to \le ≤ greater than or equal to \ge ≥ approximately equal to \approx ≈ -------------------------- ----------------- ---------------
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Josh Nicholson

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When you think of blogging you might think of a blog for cuddly cats, party parrots, the '90s, or celebrity gossip (we will not link to any of those, except cuddly cats). You probably do not think of ground breaking research, original ideas, and a powerful mechanism for research communication. And while you may be largely right, there is a world of blogging that is extremely important, a community that we wish to empower and serve with our latest feature release at Authorea, scientific blogging. In this post we wish to highlight how blogging can improve research, improve researchers career prospects, and why researchers should use a system designed for research blogging, like Authorea.Blogging as a place for correcting the scientific recordBlogging has proven to be integral towards maintaining and correcting the scientific literature. In fact, in many cases it is blogs and other forums where scientific fraud as well as common errors are first highlighted and ultimately corrected \cite{Yeo_2016}.  Blogging as a place for publishing "grey literature"Blogging allows researchers to post different types of content, ranging from journal clubs, peer reviews, single-figure observations, class essays, opinions, etc. There is a huge value to the research community to share "different" types of content, blogging allows researchers to easily do that. Blogging as a place of public outreachNearly all original peer-review publications are paywalled. Meaning it is difficult, if not impossible, for the majority of the world to legally access scientific research. Blogs, however, are nearly all completely open and accessible. More than that, they are also often times accessible in language. The discoveries and recommendations for which society invests substantial economic and human capital, should be directly disseminated by the people who really understand them, and not by the media and the political class, who often over-hype and in some case even distort the results. Blogging can be the long sought bridge between academia and the general public, something increasingly becoming required by grant agencies.Blogging as a way to advance your careerBlogs are by and large thought of as a distraction from communicating scientific ideas in a way that "counts." However, blogs can in many cases have a much larger impact on your career by providing you a forum to communicate with the world. Not all careers and hirers have such a limited way of thinking as tenure committees. Want to start blogging today? Create a group with us for free here. Want a custom design? Email us at hi@authorea.com 
Preprints (1)

Josh Nicholson

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The vast majority of academic researchers write their research in Microsoft Word \cite{Pepe_2016}. Word is easy to use due to its what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) interface, however it is limited in many ways that are necessary for effectively communicating research. It necessitates the use of publishers (some of which have very antiquated models) and it limits the capability to collaborate and share data. Furthermore, it means that proper research publishing and indexing will always be costly as the conversion from Word to HTML and JATS XML (the gold standard of research articles) is an onerous process, often times manually performed "offshore". On Authorea we seek to marry the ease of writing on Word or Google Docs with the power of LaTeX, HTML, and Git.  By doing that we seek to combine the writing and publishing process so that writing is publishing. We believe that this paradigm can not only make communicating research quicker but can also make it drastically cheaper for authors and publishers.The power of LaTeX 💪LaTeX is a powerful markup language used primarily by those in the hard sciences--physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians etc. It is immensely powerful for controlling the presentation of documents, however it comes with a steep learning curve. Want to bold text? In LaTeX you need to write \textbf{bold}. Want to italicize text? Write \textit{italicize}.  In the eyes of some researchers that extra control and access to the underlying layer of markup is a benefit allowing the precise control of typesetting at a professional level.  On the converse, many, if not most, might see this as as being too cumbersome for editing and thus will never use it. At Authorea, we believe that there are strengths and weaknesses of LaTeX. We seek to provide a broad spectrum of LaTeX support so that whether you are Donald Knuth himself or someone who thinks LaTeX is a rubber, you can take advantage of Authorea and the power of LaTeX.  Below, we highlight how we are re-positioning and repurposing LaTeX in a way that is accessible to \textit{all researchers}. 🙃 Labeling and referencing figures and headingsLabeling figures and tables is something that is commonly done when writing a research article but how you do this depends upon how you write research articles. If you're writing in Word or Google Docs, you may refer to a figure or table like this:As seen in Figure 1.If you're writing in LaTeX, you will likely refer to a figure in a different way, like this:As seen in Figure \ref{527885}.While this is not a revolutionary change, it makes editing easier if you're working with multiple figures and you need to change the organization of the document around.  On Authorea, labeling and numbering is updated automatically whenever you add, remove, or move a figure or heading. Insert a new figure or move a figure around and they are automatically re-labelled.  This feature is expected in LaTeX (and commonly used) but is difficult to achieve and consequently use in Word.  We've made it easy for researchers that typically write in Word, as well as LaTeX writers, to label and reference any part of a document.More on labels and references here 👈Powerful document exportingResearchers who write in LaTeX not only write differently than most researchers, they also tend to publish and share their work differently.  Indeed, Figure \ref{527885} highlights the differences in pre-printing (self-publishing) between fields where LaTeX is the norm (arXiv) and where LaTeX is largely unheard of (Life sciences). Although there are many issues and reasons for the differences in preprint growth between disciplines, it can't be ignored that LaTeX helps facilitate preprints by allowing researchers to produce professionally typeset documents on their own.