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Neurologists' attitudes and options for anticoagulation therapy in central China
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  • Jing Shen,
  • Man Li,
  • Shiyi Cao,
  • Zuxun Lu,
  • Yuanpeng Xia,
  • Shengcai Chen,
  • Ying Bi,
  • Zhuoyuan Cai,
  • Bo Hu,
  • Fei Cao
Jing Shen
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Man Li
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Shiyi Cao
Huazhong University of Science and Technology Tongji Medical College School of Public Health
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Zuxun Lu
Huazhong University of Science and Technology Tongji Medical College School of Public Health
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Yuanpeng Xia
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Shengcai Chen
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Ying Bi
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Zhuoyuan Cai
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Bo Hu
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Fei Cao
Wuhan Union Hospital
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Abstract

Aims: We aim to find out the factors affecting the use of anticoagulants and the intensity of their choices, and to establish a basis for improving neurologists’ effective implementation of the guidelines. Methods: A cross-sectional study is conducted in Hubei province in central China. Each neurologist completes a standard-structured anonymous questionnaire through face-to-face interviews. The problems include the attitude and options about anticoagulant therapy. Results: A total of 611 neurologists from 38 hospitals respond to this survey. For the best treatment of atrial fibrillation, more than 80% of physicians choose anticoagulant therapy. For patients with atrial fibrillation and cerebral infarction, physicians think Warfarin is the preferred drug as high as 93.8%. Among the anticoagulant drugs ever used by clinicians, the use rate of Warfarin is 93.8%, but the use rate of direct oral anticoagulants is extremely low. The use of direct oral anticoagulants is related to the educational level and the geographical location of the hospital. Bleeding risk is the first reason influencing clinicians’ choice of Warfarin, accounts for 88.9%. 97.7% of the clinicians recommend patients with Warfarin regularly monitoring the INR, but the frequency of monitoring is inconsistent. Clinicians have a high willingness to learn about AF, but the proportion of hospitals carry out appropriate training is low. Conclusions: There are still some gaps with the guidelines on the choice of anticoagulant drugs. Neurologists have positive attitude towards anticoagulant therapy and a strong willingness to learn, but the corresponding training is lacking. Continuous professional training is necessary.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

15 Jul 2020Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
16 Jul 2020Assigned to Editor
16 Jul 2020Submission Checks Completed
04 Aug 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned