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A refined panel of 42 microsatellite loci to universally genotype catarrhine primates
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  • Franziska Trede,
  • Niels Kil,
  • James Stranks,
  • Andrew Connell,
  • Julia Fischer ,
  • Julia Ostner,
  • Oliver Schülke,
  • Dietmar Zinner,
  • Christian Roos
Franziska Trede
German Primate Centre Leibniz Institute for Primate Research
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Niels Kil
University of Göttingen
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James Stranks
University of Göttingen
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Andrew Connell
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
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Julia Fischer
German Primate Centre Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, University of Göttingen
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Julia Ostner
Georg-August-Universitat Gottingen Fakultat fur Biologie und Psychologie
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Oliver Schülke
Georg-August-Universitat Gottingen Fakultat fur Biologie und Psychologie
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Dietmar Zinner
German Primate Centre Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Baboon Group
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Christian Roos
German Primate Centre Leibniz Institute for Primate Research
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Abstract

1. Microsatellite genotyping is an important genetic method for a number of research questions in biology. Given that the traditional fragment length analysis using polyacrylamide gel or capillary electrophoresis has several drawbacks, microsatellite genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) has arisen as a promising alternative. Although GBS mitigates many of the problems of fragment length analysis, issues with allelic dropout and null alleles often remain due to mismatches in primer binding sites and unnecessarily long PCR products. This is also true for GBS in catarrhine primates where cross-species amplification of loci (often human derived) is common. 2. We therefore redesigned primers for 45 microsatellite loci based on 17 available catarrhine reference genomes. Next, we tested them in singleplex and different multiplex settings in a panel of species representing all major lineages of Catarrhini and further validated them in wild Guinea baboons (Papio papio) using faecal samples. 3. The final panel of 42 microsatellite loci can efficiently be amplified with primers distributed into three amplification pools. 4. With our microsatellite panel, we provide a tool to universally genotype catarrhine primates via GBS from different sample sources in a cost- and time-efficient way, with higher resolution, and comparability among laboratories and species.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

26 Aug 2020Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
26 Aug 2020Assigned to Editor
26 Aug 2020Submission Checks Completed
16 Sep 2020Reviewer(s) Assigned