loading page

Toxoplasma gondii Infection by Serological and Molecular Methods in Schizophrenia Patients with and without Suicide Attempts: An Age-Sex-Matched Case-Control Study
  • +6
  • Özer Akgül,
  • Ömer Faruk Demirel,
  • Cana Poyraz Aksoy,
  • Ezgi Tanrıöver Aydın,
  • Nuray Uysal,
  • Ersel Bulu,
  • Burcu Sapmaz,
  • Reyhan Çalışkan,
  • Yaşar Ali Öner
Özer Akgül
Author Profile
Ömer Faruk Demirel
Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul University – Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine
Author Profile
Cana Poyraz Aksoy
Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul University – Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine
Author Profile
Ezgi Tanrıöver Aydın
Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul University – Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine
Author Profile
Nuray Uysal
Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul University – Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine
Author Profile
Ersel Bulu
Department of Psychiatry, Istanbul University – Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine
Author Profile
Burcu Sapmaz
Department of Medical Microbiology, Istanbul Aydin University, School of Medicine
Author Profile
Reyhan Çalışkan
Department of Medical Microbiology, Istanbul Aydin University, School of Medicine
Author Profile
Yaşar Ali Öner
Department of Medical Microbiology, Istanbul Aydin University, School of Medicine
Author Profile

Abstract

Introduction: The opinion that latent T. gondii infection is having a broadly asymptomatic projection has now been interrogated, in specific due to the echoed association between the latent infection and an elevated incidence of schizophrenia or even suicide attempts. Notwithstanding conducted studies aimed to understand this feasible link are restricted. Methods: In the present case-control study, we focused to illuminate the relationship between the serological and molecular presence of T. gondii and schizophrenia with or without the suicide attempts by comparing it with healthy individuals. A total of 237 participants (117 in schizophrenia; 120 in healthy control) were included in this study. Results: Overall, latent T. gondii infections were found statistically higher in 63 (53.8%) of the 117 patients with schizophrenia and in 33 (27.5%) of the 120 controls (p < 0.001). In schizophrenia patients, seroprevalence T. gondii was again found to be statistically higher in suicide attempters (59.6%), compared to no history of suicide attempts (48.3%) (p < 0.05). The molecular positivity rate of T. gondii DNA was higher in the schizophrenia group, compared to the healthy control group (p < 0.05), whereas the history of suicide attempts was not statistically associated (p = 0.831) with T. gondii DNA positivity by PCR. Conclusion: This case-control study enlightens additional demonstration to the belief that T. gondii infection would be an underlying component for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Regardless of the clarity results of this study, this supposition warrants further endorsement.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

31 Jan 2021Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
01 Feb 2021Submission Checks Completed
01 Feb 2021Assigned to Editor
19 Feb 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
28 Feb 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Mar 20211st Revision Received
19 Mar 2021Submission Checks Completed
19 Mar 2021Assigned to Editor
10 Apr 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
09 May 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
11 May 2021Editorial Decision: Accept