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Sevoflurane but not propofol enhances ovarian cancer cell malignancy through regulating cellular metabolic and signalling mechanisms
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  • Cong Hu,
  • Bincheng Wang,
  • Zhigang Liu,
  • Qiling Chen,
  • Masashi Ishikawa,
  • Han Lin,
  • Qingquan Lian,
  • jun li,
  • Jia Li,
  • Daqing Ma
Cong Hu
Wenzhou Medical University Second Affiliated Hospital
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Bincheng Wang
Imperial College London
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Zhigang Liu
Imperial College London
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Qiling Chen
Imperial College London
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Masashi Ishikawa
Imperial College London
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Han Lin
Wenzhou Medical University Second Affiliated Hospital
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Qingquan Lian
Wenzhou Medical University Second Affiliated Hospital
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jun li
Wenzhou Medical University Second Affiliated Hospital
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Jia Li
Imperial College London
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Daqing Ma
Imperial College London
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Abstract

Background and Purpose: Surgery remains the first-line treatment of ovarian cancer. However, perioperative risk factors including the choice of anaesthetics may influence its recurrence after surgery. In the current study, it was hypothesised that inhalational anaesthetic sevoflurane and intravenous anaesthetic propofol might affect cancer cellular metabolism and signalling, which might interfere the malignancy of ovarian cancer cells. Experimental Approach: Cultured ovarian cancer cells were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane or administered with 4 μg/mL propofol for 2 hours followed by 24 hours recovery. Their cell viability, proliferation, migration and invasion were assessed using cell counting kit-8, Ki-67 staining, wound healing and Transwell assay. Cellular signalling biomarkers were measured using immunofluorescent staining and/or Western blot. Cultured media were collected for 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics analysis. Key Results: The cell viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells were enhanced by sevoflurane but suppressed by propofol. Sevoflurane increased the GLUT1, MPC1, GLUD1, p-Erk1/2, and HIF-1α expressions but decreased the PEDF expression. In contrast to the sevoflurane treatment, the “mirror changes” of these cellular markers were observed with propofol. Sevoflurane increased levels of isopropanol but decreased glucose and glutamine levels in the media, but the opposite changes of those metabolites were found after propofol treatment. Conclusion and Implications: These data indicated that unlike propofol, sevoflurane enhanced ovarian cancer cell metabolism and activated PEDF/Erk/HIF-1α cellular signalling pathway, suggesting that sevoflurane might have pro-tumour property but propofol might afford an anti-tumour property. The translational value of this work warrants further study.